Sr. Audrey Sagan, CDP Memorial Photo Album

Please leave a comment to share your thoughts and memories of Sr. Audrey.

Due to the pandemic, we will not be able to gather to wake Sister Audrey. A prayer service will be held on Wednesday, May 27, 2020, at 6:30 p.m. in the Mother of Divine Providence Chapel. It will be live streamed here: https://video.ibm.com/channel/Q4zW6rUvwPq.

Sr. Marise Hrabosky, CDP Memorial Photo Album

Please leave a comment to share your thoughts and memories of Sr. Marise.

Due to the pandemic, we will not be able to gather together to wake Sr. Marise. A prayer service will be held on Thursday, May 21, 2020, at 6:30 p.m. in the Mother of Providence Chapel. It will be live streamed here: https://video.ibm.com/channel/Q4zW6rUvwPq. CLICK HERE to print the prayer service. A memorial mass will be celebrated at a later date.

 

 

 

Easter Sunday

We welcome your participation with our interactive blog and encourage you to Leave a Comment to share your thoughts or reflections.

 

April 12, 2020

Resurrection, Donald Jackson, Copyright 2002, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved. http://www.saintjohnsbible.org/Promotions/Explore/#book/961

JN 20:1-9

John’s gospel is one of four different takes on Jesus’ passion, crucifixion, and resurrection. The central focus here is on Jesus’ appearance to Mary Magdalene in the garden.

In this illumination Christ is robed, as in the Transfiguration, but with shades of royal purple. We stand behind him as we stood behind Lazarus, not direct witnesses of his glory but contemplating the events past, present, and future. Farther back is the tomb, flanked by two figures in white, angels in John’s gospel but elsewhere messengers of the resurrection. Also in the background are the three crosses of Golgotha, luminous now and tinged with gold. The stamped patterns from the carpet pages suggest this is both an end and merely a pause before the beginning. The vibrant strokes of yellow and blue take us beyond the dawn of Mary’s first discovery to the fullness of day in which Christ appears and will appear again.

Mary is the most detailed figure on the page, fully corporeal in her decorated red garment. Her face is red, reflecting the glory she sees in Jesus’ face. Instead of seeing Jesus, we see him in her response. Her hand becomes translucent, however, as she reaches to touch Jesus’ face. We can see that she wants to hold on to the Jesus she knew on earth, but he tells her to embrace instead the fullness of the resurrection.

The text reads that Mary Magdalene goes to the garden before sunrise. She is caught off guard by the fact that the stone has been rolled away. After relating the news to Peter and the Beloved Disciple, she follows the two back to the tomb. They return home, bewildered; she, on the other hand, remains. In her grief, she peers inside the tomb and sees two angels.

The next part of the narrative gives us insight into the nature of the resurrection. Jesus appears to her, but she thinks he is the gardener. Although she looks at him, he seems a stranger. Only when he calls her by name does she recognize him and call out to him with what must have been a familiar address, “Teacher!” Like a photograph, the illumination captures this moment, but unlike a photograph, the scene is reconstructed in the imagination of the artist.

Several things in the image and the text demand our attention. The encounter between Jesus and Mary parallels the interplay between darkness and light throughout John’s gospel, where darkness is always bad and representative of evil forces, and light is always good and symbolizes Christ. Mary goes to the tomb in the darkness and meets Christ in the garden as the sun rises. Metaphorically, she moves from hesitant fear to falling at his feet and clutching him; he is both strange and familiar at the same time. Mary sees Christ’s glorified body, a body that is at once unrecognizable and recognizable. In fact, it is the sound of Jesus’ voice that alerts her to his identity. The subdued colors replicate morning’s first light. Everything else in the garden is but a shadow.

The sole focus is on Mary and Christ; the narrative does not furnish any other distracting details. We see Mary’s reaction but not Christ’s. Based on this rendition of Mary Magdalene’s experience with the resurrected Christ, the first account of such a human interaction with the risen Lord, we have the broad outline of the Christian understanding of the resurrection. We view Mary at the moment she sees what the resurrection entails, and it is an insight that can only surface from love.

 

Please click on Leave a Comment (above) to share your thoughts and reflections.

 

Domingo de Pascua
Jn.  20: 1-9

El evangelio de Juan es uno de los cuatro pasajes diferentes de la pasión, crucifixión y resurrección de Jesús.  El enfoque central está aquí en la aparición de Jesús a María Magdalena en el jardín.

En esta iluminación, Cristo está vestido, como en la Transfiguración, pero con tonos de púrpura real.  Estamos ubicados detrás de él y Lázaro, no testigos directos de su gloria, sino contemplando los eventos pasados, presentes y futuros.  En la parte de atrás está la tumba, flanqueada por dos figuras en blanco, ángeles en el evangelio de Juan pero en otros lugares mensajeros de la resurrección.  También en el fondo están las tres cruces del Gólgota, luminosas ahora y teñidas de oro.  Los patrones estampados de las páginas de la alfombra sugieren que esto es tanto un final como una pausa antes del comienzo.  Las pinceladas vibrantes de amarillo y azul nos llevan más allá del amanecer del primer descubrimiento de María Magdalena a la plenitud del día el cual Cristo aparece y aparecerá de nuevo.

María Magdalena es la figura más detallada de la escena, totalmente corpórea en su prenda roja decorada.  Su rostro es rojo, reflejando la gloria que ve en el rostro de Jesús.  En lugar de ver nosotros a Jesús, lo vemos en su respuesta.  Sin embargo, su mano se vuelve translúcida cuando alcanza a tocar el rostro de Jesús.  Podemos ver que ella quiere aferrarse al Jesús que conocía en la tierra, pero él le dice que al contrario abrace la plenitud de la resurrección.

El texto dice que María Magdalena va al jardín antes del amanecer.  Ella es tomada por sorpresa por el hecho de que la piedra ha sido rodada.  Después de relatar la noticia a Pedro y al discípulo amado, ella sigue a los dos de regreso a la tumba.  Ellos regresan a su casa, desconcertados;  ella, por otro lado, permanece.  En su dolor, ella mira dentro de la tumba y ve a dos ángeles.

La parte siguiente de la narración nos da una idea de la naturaleza de la resurrección.  Jesús se le aparece, pero ella piensa que él es el jardinero.  Aunque ella lo mira, él le parece un extraño.  Solo cuando la llama por su nombre, ella lo reconoce y lo llama con lo que debe haber sido un trato familiar, “¡Maestro!” Como si fuera una fotografía, la iluminación captura este momento, pero a diferencia de una fotografía, la escena se reconstruye en la  Imaginación del artista.

Varias cosas en la imagen y el texto demandan nuestra atención.  El encuentro entre Jesús y María Magdalena es paralelo a la interacción entre la oscuridad y la luz en todo el evangelio de Juan, donde la oscuridad siempre es mala y representativa de las fuerzas del mal, y la luz siempre es buena y simboliza a Cristo.  María Magdalena va a la tumba en la oscuridad y se encuentra con Cristo en el jardín cuando sale el sol.  Metafóricamente, ella pasa del miedo vacilante al caer a sus pies y agarrarlo;  Él es extraño y familiar al mismo tiempo.  María Magdalena ve el cuerpo glorificado de Cristo, un cuerpo que es a la vez irreconocible y reconocible.  De hecho, es el sonido de la voz de Jesús lo que la alerta sobre su identidad.  Los colores apagados replican la primera luz de la mañana.  Todo lo demás en el jardín es solo una sombra.

El único enfoque está en María Magdalena y Cristo;  La narración no proporciona ningún otro detalle que distraiga.

Vemos la reacción de María Magdalena pero no la de Cristo.  Con base en esta interpretación de la experiencia de María Magdalena con el Cristo resucitado, el primer relato de una interacción tan humana con el Señor resucitado, tenemos un amplio resumen de la comprensión cristiana de la resurrección.  Vemos a Mary en el momento en que ve lo que implica la resurrección y es una visión que solo puede surgir del amor.

 

Haga clic en ‘Leave a Comment ‘ (arriba) para compartir sus pensamientos y reflexiones.

Palm Sunday

We welcome your participation with our interactive blog and encourage you to Leave a Comment to share your thoughts or reflections.

 

April 5, 2020

Rejoice!, Hazel Dolby, Copyright 2005, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

The illumination for this week is entitled REJOICE!

The text is from Zechariah 9:9-17; 10:1-5

“Lo, your king comes to you; triumphant and victorious is he, humble and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.”

This image links the text to the Triumphant Entry celebrated on Palm Sunday. It is filled with paradox in its depiction of a journey. It is still and peaceful, yet filled with melancholy. In the illumination the king, with head bowed, arrives on a donkey. The donkey is a colt, and the man’s feet hang almost to the ground. Palm trees dominate the scene. In the upper left hand corner is a shadow of a city.

In the Gospel account, Jesus arrives in Jerusalem on a donkey, greeted by people singing Hosanna and calling him the messiah, the Son of David, laying down palms in his path (Matt 21:1-10). He does not come to rule, however, but to prepare for his crucifixion. Victorious triumph is not not the imaged as a proud, conquering hero, but as a Suffering Servant.

Are the words and images in this illumination complementary or in tension?
What has your journey been?

 

Please click on Leave a Comment (above) to share your thoughts and reflections.

 

Domingo de Ramos
La iluminación de esta semana se títula ¡ALEGRÍA!

El texto es de Zacarías 9: 9-17;10: 1-5

“Mira, tu rey viene a ti;  triunfante y victorioso es él, humilde y cabalgando sobre un asno, sobre un pollino hijo de asna.  ”

Esta imagen vincula el texto con la entrada triunfal celebrada el Domingo de Ramos.  Está lleno de paradojas en su descripción de un viaje.  Es tranquilo y pacífico, pero lleno de melancolía.  En la iluminación, el rey, con la cabeza inclinada, llega en un burro.  El burro es un asno, y los pies del hombre cuelgan casi hasta el suelo.  Las palmeras dominan la escena.  En la esquina superior izquierda hay una sombra de una ciudad.

En el relato del Evangelio, Jesús llega a Jerusalén montado en un burro, es saludado por personas que cantan Hosanna y lo llaman el Mesías, el Hijo de David, con las palmas puestas en su camino (Mateo 21: 1-10).  Sin embargo, no viene a gobernar, sino a prepararse para su crucifixión.  El triunfo victorioso no se representa como un héroe orgulloso y conquistador, sino como un Siervo Sufriente.

Las palabras e imágenes en esta iluminación, ¿son complementarias o están en tensión?
¿Cómo ha sido tu viaje?

 

Haga clic en ‘Leave a Comment ‘ (arriba) para compartir sus pensamientos y reflexiones.

Fifth Sunday of Lent

We welcome your participation with our interactive blog and encourage you to Leave a Comment to share your thoughts or reflections.

 

March 29, 2020

Raising of Lazarus, Donald Jackson, Copyright 2002, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved. http://www.saintjohnsbible.org/Promotions/Explore/#book/953

Jn 11:3-7, 17, 20-27, 33b-45

The text narrates the experience of siblings who were friends of Jesus.  The sisters chastise Jesus for his absence at the untimely death of their brother. (And when is death timely?)  Confronted with the grief of the two sisters, the text says that Jesus was “greatly disturbed in his spirit” (Jn 11:33).  In the story, it become obvious that the only answer to the questions of suffering and evil is the one Jesus gave to Mary and Martha: shared helplessness, shared distress, and shared tears with no attempt to try to explain God’s seeming absence.  Rather, we are called to trust that because God is all-loving and all-powerful, in time, all will be well and our pain will someday be redeemed in God’s embrace.

In this illumination of the raising of Lazarus we are given a new perspective. We are not outside the tomb weeping and waiting. We are inside the tomb behind Lazarus awakening to the tunnel of white light beaming from the outside. (Recalling near death experiences). At its center is Jesus. A death head moth spreads its patterned wings amidst the patterned wrappings of Lazarus’ shroud. The scene is a contrast between light and darkness. Christ is hardly recognizable. Neither is Lazarus.

The scene is a contrast between the powers of darkness and the powers of light. This is the pivotal scene in the Gospel which will put Jesus on the path to the cross–the real triumph of life over death, light over darkness.

God of the resurrection, you heard your Son Jesus’ prayer and raised Lazarus from the dead: hear these our prayers that one day we, too, might enjoy eternal life with you.

Unbind us from our attachment to the past and our fear of the future.

Raise us to an appreciation of the gift of the moment.

Unbind us from bigotry, prejudice, ignorance and insensitivity.

Raise us to an acceptance of others as children of God.

Unbind us from our lack of caring and our indifference to the needs of others.

Raise us to value the worth of all God’s people.

Unbind us from the unrealistic expectations and limitations we place on others.   Raise us to express your love and compassion to all.

Unbind us from the influence of the distorted values presented by the media.

Raise us to follow the message of the Gospel.

Unbind us from the pressure to compromise who we are in order to gain acceptance other.

Raise us to know your unconditional love.

Unbind us from our lack of honesty wit ourselves and in our relationships with others.

Raise us to your truth.

Raise us to follow Jesus’ example of service and humility.

Free us from the death-dealing power of the spirit of evil,

Unbind us from all that holds us captive and raise us to new life so that our lives may bear witness to the risen Christ, for he lives forever and ever. Amen

 

Please click on Leave a Comment (above) to share your thoughts and reflections.

 

Quinto domingo de Cuaresma
Jn 11: 3-7, 17, 20-27, 33b-45

El texto narra la experiencia de unas hermanas que eran amigas de Jesús.  Las hermanas reprenden a Jesús por su ausencia ante la muerte prematura de su hermano.  (¿Y cuándo es oportuna la muerte?) Ante el dolor de las dos hermanas, el texto dice que Jesús estaba “muy perturbado en su espíritu” (Jn 11:33).  En la narración, se hace evidente que la única respuesta a las preguntas sobre el sufrimiento y el mal es la que Jesús les dio a María y Marta; compartió con ellas su impotencia, angustia y lágrimas compartidas sin ningún intento de explicar la aparente ausencia de Dios.  Más bien, estamos llamados a confiar porque Dios es todo amoroso y todopoderoso, a sutiempo, todo estará bien y nuestro dolor algún día será redimido en el abrazo de Dios.

En esta iluminación de la resurrección de Lázaro, se nos da una nueva perspectiva.  No estamos fuera de la tumba llorando y esperando.  Estamos dentro de la tumba detrás de Lázaro cuando está despertando al túnel de luz blanca que irradia desde el exterior.  (Recordando experiencias en el trance de la muerte).  En su centro está Jesús.  Una mariposa nocturna extiende sus alas estampadas en medio de las envolturas estampadas en la mortaja de Lázaro.  La escena es un contraste entre la luz y la oscuridad.  Cristo es apenas reconocible.  Tampoco Lázaro.

La escena es un contraste entre los poderes de la obscuridad y los poderes de la luz.  Esta es la escena fundamental en el Evangelio que pondrá a Jesús en el camino a la cruz: el verdadero triunfo de la vida sobre la muerte, la luz sobre la oscuridad.

Dios de la resurrección, escuchaste la oración de tu Hijo Jesús y resucitaste a Lázaro de entre los muertos: escucha estas oraciones para que algún día nosotros también podamos disfrutar de la vida eterna contigo.

Desátanos de nuestro apego al pasado y de nuestro miedo al futuro.
Levántanos a una apreciación del regalo del momento.

Desátanos del fanatismo, los prejuicios, la ignorancia y la insensibilidad.
Levántanos a la aceptación de otros como hijos de Dios.

Desátanos de nuestra falta de cuidado y nuestra indiferencia hacia las necesidades de los demás.
Levántanos para valorar la dignidad humana de todo el pueblo de Dios.

Desátanos de las expectativas y limitaciones poco realistas que ponemos en los demás.  Levántanos para expresar su amor y compasión a todos.

Desátanos de la influencia de los valores distorsionados presentados por los medios.
Levántanos para seguir el mensaje del Evangelio.

Desátanos de la presión de comprometer quiénes somos en cambio a ganar la aceptación de otros.
Levántanos para conocer tu amor incondicional.

Desátanos de nuestra falta de honestidad con nosotros mismos y en nuestras relaciones con los demás.  Levántanos a tu verdad.

Desátanos para seguir el ejemplo de Jesus en servicio y humildad.
Levántanos del poder de la muerte y del espíritu del mal,

Desátanos de todo lo que nos mantiene cautivos y levántanos a una nueva vida para que así nuestras vidas puedan dar testimonio del Cristo resucitado, porque él vive por siempre y para siempre.  Amén

 

Haga clic en ‘Leave a Comment ‘ (arriba) para compartir sus pensamientos y reflexiones.

Fourth Sunday of Lent

We welcome your participation with our interactive blog and encourage you to Leave a Comment to share your thoughts or reflections.

 

March 22, 2020

At the Last Trumpet, Hazel Dolby, Copyright 2011, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

A very puzzling piece in the Gospel reading for this Sunday (click here to view) is the fact that at the time of the blind man’s greatest experience of freedom, the incredibly uplifting moment when a whole new life is given to him, everyone refused to rejoice with him! People denied knowing him. Even his parents distanced themselves. He had been changed. He was healed, liberated from darkness, the miraculous work of God was evident in him. And no one would acknowledge it.

Could it be that his healing meant that the community had to adjust their perceptions, their boundaries, their entrenched ways of thinking and acting?

cc The blues tones are shot through with gold lines representing Divine life. The movement is unexpected. We are drawn from top to bottom, from right to left.

Are the words “We will be changed” a threat or a promise?

Where are we in our Lenten journey?

Please click on Leave a Comment (above) to share your thoughts and reflections.

 

Cuarto domingo de Cuaresma

Una pasaje muy desconcertante de la lectura del Evangelio para este domingo es el hecho de que en el momento de la mayor experiencia de liberación del ciego, en el momento increíblemente más inspirador cuando se le da una vida completamente nueva, ¡todos se negaron a alegrarse con él! La gente negó conocerlo.  Incluso, sus padres se distanciaron. El fue transformado. Fue sanado, liberado de la oscuridad, la obra milagrosa de Dios era evidente en él. Y nadie lo aceptaba.

¿Podría ser que su curación significaba que la comunidad tenía que ajustarse a sus percepciones, sus límites, sus formas arraigadas de pensar y actuar?

La iluminación con su enfoque en un patrón geométrico sutil, sugiere  una forma de asamblea y la promesa de nuestra transformación en Cristo.  Los tonos azules se disparan con líneas doradas que representan la vida divina.  El movimiento es inesperado.  Somos atraídos de arriba a abajo, de derecha a izquierda.

¿Son las palabras “seremos cambiados” una amenaza o una promesa?
¿Dónde estamos en nuestro viaje cuaresmal?

 

Haga clic en ‘Leave a Comment ‘ (arriba) para compartir sus pensamientos y reflexiones.

Third Sunday of Lent

We welcome your participation with our interactive blog and encourage you to Leave a Comment to share your thoughts or reflections.

 

March 15, 2020

Listen to Him (Mark, Chapter 11), Donald Jackson, Copyright 2002, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

The readings for this Sunday in Lent (to view click here) share a common, though covert, refrain—the admonition to “Listen”. The theme is coupled in the first reading and in the Gospel with the image of water. Like those wanderers in the desert, we thirst. Like the Samaritan woman, Jesus promises to quench that thirst.

In the responsorial psalm we find the key to satisfy our need and desire, “If today you hear you hear His voice, harden not your hearts.”

The life of the Spirit permeates all of creation. We are called to be attentive, to listen with open, pliable hearts. God speaks to us in a multitude of ways, both ordinary and extraordinary. But in our fast-paced, crowded, and noisy society, it’s sometimes difficult to listen. Listening means that we strain to understand the feelings of others. Listening asked us to look with genuine wonder at events that we don’t fully comprehend. Listening calls us to be willing to open ourselves to possibilities and conclusions that are not our own.

Listening is a critical skill for those who are committed to hearing the word of God and doing it. As the Samaritan woman testifies, listening, having our thirst quenched, leads to proclamation, to ministry.

 

In what areas of our lives are we still thirsty?

Where will we choose to turn when we’re thirsty?

What do we hear when our hearts listen?

Please click on Leave a Comment (above) to share your thoughts and reflections.

 

Tercer domingo de Cuaresma

Las lecturas de este domingo en la Cuaresma comparten un refrán común, aunque está encubierto: la advertencia de “Escuchar”. El tema se entrelaza con la primera lectura y el Evangelio, con la imagen del agua.  Como esos viajeros en el desierto, tenemos sed. Al igual que a la mujer samaritana, Jesús le promete calmar esa sed.

En el salmo responsorial encontramos la clave para satisfacer nuestra necesidad y deseo: “Si hoy escuchas y oyes su voz, no endurezcas tu corazón”.

La vida del Espíritu impregna toda la creación. Somos llamados a estar atentos, a escuchar con corazones abiertos y flexibles. Dios nos habla de múltiples maneras, tanto ordinarias como extraordinarias. Pero en nuestra sociedad acelerada, abarrotada y ruidosa, a veces es difícil escuchar. El escuchar significa que nos esforcemos por comprender los sentimientos de los demás. El escuchar nos pide que miremos con asombro genuino los acontecimientos que no comprendemos completamente. El escuchar nos llama a estar dispuestos a abrirnos a posibilidades y conclusiones que no son nuestras.

El escuchar es una habilidad crítica para aquellos que están comprometidos a escuchar la palabra de Dios y llevarla a cabo. Como la mujer samaritana testifica, el escuchar y el calmar nuestra sed, nos conduce a la proclamación, al ministerio.

¿En qué áreas de nuestras vidas todavía tenemos sed?
¿Dónde elegiremos acudir cuando tengamos sed?
¿Qué escuchamos cuando nuestros corazones están a la escucha?

 

Haga clic en ‘Leave a Comment ‘ (arriba) para compartir sus pensamientos y reflexiones.