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  1. When I called some of Sr. Anne’s friends to notify them of her death, as I promised her I would, this dear story was shared with me.
    Bill said when he was 4 years old Sr. Anne babysat him. He can remember having his hand in hers walking down a hill to go get ice cream. He then said he told his wife that something was terribly wrong because this was the first time in 57 years that he didn’t receive a birthday card from her. He then said there were three women in his life that loved him and whom he loved. His mother, his wife, and Sr. Anne. She was like a second mother to him. In notifying people from her address book I heard many similar stories. She touched many people’s lives.

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  2. Sr. Anne Arnold was one of the best people I ever knew. She was dedicated, compassionate, generous, and had such a great sense of humor that I will always remember the twinkle in her eye and her grin when something amusing was said. She helped many children learn to read, and that was a legacy that will extend far beyond her life here on earth. My sympathy to the community and her family and friends. We all lost a Sister whose life was an example.

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  3. I feel privileged and honored to have called Anne my friend. She shared many stories with me from her childhood, even though she was a very private person. I will miss our weekly phone calls, our visits in letter and cards, and when I got to Pittsburgh our outings at Bonefish or Handels for ice cream. Having known the agony of her pain, I am happy she is now pain free and enjoying her Provident God. I will miss her and yet the veil between is thin so I know she is with me now in a new way.

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  4. Sister Anne told my mom that when she was diagnosed, she remembered her brother Roger saying “at least it’s not a child”. She said that at that moment my image flashed before her eyes and from then on she offered all of her suffering for me. I can’t even imagine being that selfless. I hope that I will grow into that kind of giving. For now, I am grateful.

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  5. Sister Anne and I became friends in the 60″s, From then on she became Anne of Arnold to me. Many years later I spent some time at the Provincial House recovering from a fall. Anne would visit me daily and ask what she could do for me. I soon learned that I could not even hint at things I liked because Anne would appear the next day with more than enough. This last year, Anne replied to every card I sent her until she finally stated that this was it, She did not have the strength to respond anymore. Anne was graceful and gracefilled. May she rest in peace and remember her many friends along the way.

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